Student-Teacher Relationship

The most important factor governing a student’s learning is dependant on the relationship he shares with his teacher(s).

Gone are the days of “spare the rod and spoil the child“. Today, teachers, better known as ‘facilitators‘, are making students aspire to be better graduates, better working professionals and even better individuals.

A teacher is faced with many daunting tasks. She needs to put herself in the shoes of her students in order to understand them well, and quickly get a feel of their hang-ups. Taking up this profession means taking up responsibility of many young, unexposed children. It requires devoted listening ears and a compassionate heart to her students.

Empathy is an indispensable quality for all teachers to possess. Besides IQ, it is very important for teachers to understand every student’s EQ (Emotional Quotient) as well.

That’s how the beautiful relationship of a mentor and a mentee is nurtured. The ‘growing up‘ phase is one dilemma for the students, when they usually fall back on their peers for advice.

Mistakes committed at this age can at times prove to be scarring. Since a child spends a majority of his time at school, it is more likely that his teachers would be in a better position to influence his decisions, after his friends.

Those blessed with facilitators who can guide them correctly, should consider themselves lucky. According to a survey done in the United States, a teacher-student relationship has been identified as a significant influence on the overall school and behavioural adjustment. Positive teacher-student relationships, defined as “warm, close, communicative” are linked to behavioural competence and better school adjustment. Other researchers found that conflict in teacher-student relationships are related to unfavourable outcomes such as a negative school attitude, school avoidance and hostile aggression among students.

A healthy student-teacher relationship is a vehicle that contributes to optimum student learning; a relationship that becomes a motivator for those involved in the learning experience.

Sunayana Gupta | Sr. Academic Coordinator | Samsara School

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Connecting School life to Real life

Core Skills journey started for most of us in October 2015. The two days session on development of (Critical Thinking) and (Problem Solving) skills through connecting classrooms, had been an exciting roller coaster ride. When I registered for the workshop, I had no idea that some day I would come so far in achieving this objective of imparting these skills to my students.

The training session by the British Council opened our minds to exploring new possibilities and pedagogy for class room teaching. The perception, questioning and group discussions were some of the tools that I used to direct students to the objective of teaching Critical Thinking and Problem Solving.

I decided to take the plunge into this challenge after doing my research. I had discussions with Parents, teachers and learners. We reached a conclusion that once these students pass out of school, they need to be assets to the society. These assets should be able to critically analyse any given issue and reach workable solutions to the unforeseen ones.

I decided to teach (attitude and tolerance) in Value Education class and I integrated it with another lesson in English in which protagonist fails to achieve his goals because of his negative and condescending attitude.

And, lo and behold…my students did me proud when they were not only receptive to questions and participative in group discussions, but also emerged with very viable and practical solutions and suggestions.

What more, they all volunteered to take up leadership roles bringing into play healthy discussions and reaching to decisions on various issues, with their friends, families, neighbours and school mates. The change reciprocated in their turned-up attitude and perception towards other people and experiences, putting them on the broader platform of tolerance and civilization.

I left the class with a smile on my face and hope in my heart. My class 9 rocks!

Capt. Praveen Roy | Principal | Samsara School

Inclusive Education | An Embrace To Special Needs

On the Footway of Education, every Teacher can recount numerous highs and lows experienced while walking their journeys across it.

To break my story, I experienced both; great moments withe days starting with hope-excitement and contentment seeping in with the fall of dusk, assuring me that I chose the right path while on the crossroads of career choices, just sometime ago.

Flipping sides, were days of contemplation questioning the same career choice; an obvious fallout of uninterested students and shying away attitudes, or worse unanticipated blow-ups with zero accomplishments.

My journey of Inclusive Education started a year ago, growing from 8 special students to 10 beautifully evolved beings now. One of the simplest qualities we as humans should attribute (but we often fail) can be seen in abundance in all these children- Truth & Loyalty of the heart.

I started my career only as a fresher with these children but with their support and smiles, I grew to work harder with full enthusiasm and devotion, casting out all the inhibitions in me of a Fresher.

As a Teacher, your relationship with a student starts the moment you meet him/her. No matter how difficult a student may be, you need to embrace the challenge of getting to know him/her. Every child is different and each one deserves love.

Life has enough hard knocks in-store for a child who struggles with education in different ways but you may be one of those few people the child believes can take care of him/her. This could make a difference in the choices they make everyday in life, or to the least in their decision of not to disrupt the regular class. They all have the courage to do something good in life. All we need to do is Hear them, Know them & Trust them.

It has come quite naturally to me that I feel bonded with my students and form endearing relationships in no matter of time. This acts as strength in getting my learnings across, improvising their attention spans and building responsiveness in them.

As a Special Educator, I firmly believe that one needs to build a healthy rapport with the students first, for them to really listen and do their best.

Teaching is a very active job, especially with these sensitive areas where establishing relationships with students is imperative, before exposing them to the regular academic curriculum.

For me one thing that holds vital importance while playing the role of an Educator is to form a positive relationship with parents in order to make them aware and give an in-depth understanding of the child’s areas of assistance. I quickly feel defeated when that doesn’t happen. I am often discouraged when parents are not ready to accept the reality of their child, which in-turn only leads to child’s loss.

Regardless of the level of Education a child can attain in life, whatever they learn today should clear their concepts for life, which is unattainable without the support and comfort of the Educator as well as of the Parents.

It’s heart breaking to see a child who was once highly motivated, now no longer shows interest because his/her parents fail to understand the true value of Education and download this expression to their child.

Children are people who have feelings, who don’t want to feel cornered. They want to learn but they also want to feel as if they have some control over themselves. I never make assumptions about a student before they come into my class.

Every student is different; no two students react in the same way. It’s our role as teachers to find out what motivates each student for learning and also what triggers them to misbehave. If we can meet this disconnect in them and drive out the negative stimulants, we can go a long way towards a more effective classroom and learning environment.

In the end, all these challenges are equally difficult and when combined, as they often are on a daily basis, almost impossible to juggle. On most days, I feel like I’m part of the juggling act in a circus. But-despite the hardships I’ve faced in my teaching – I’m determined to beat the odds and not be a statistic.

Special Education Is My Calling & I’d Always Want To Feel The Same Love For My Job As I Do Now !!

Ritika Tomar | Special Educator | Samsara School

Edited by: Namrata Gupta 

Lack of Harmony & Upsurge Anxiety | The Millennial Youth

Lack of the right attitude (Indiscipline, if I may say so) and Restlessness are homing in the Generation X these days; triggering and forcing us to contemplate on WHY?

We often witness problematic behaviours in our Children, and around. But have we ever tried bringing to light the reasons behind? As I give you the core, I know for sure it won’t come across as the most palatable or an anticipated marking, atleast for most of us.

We (The Adults) are more to be questioned, fairly blamed for such ado patterns in our Children.

Children have been and’ll always be Children: raw and callow, ready to experiment with and explore the world with their age-hemmed vision of life.

Their angled habit of years, make them obey their Parents, WHILST we as Parents start to obey our Children, either out of excessive love and/or benighted indifference. That’s when we open up a whole new can of worms.

The problems start to seep in, with the unruly teenage stimulating them to not just lose their control over themselves, but also make way towards uncontrolled exercise of freedom and improper behaviour.

It’s then, the word ‘NO’ sets them off, making them Defiant Children.

The Parents who do not put their foot down at the right time usually have Children, crushing the dreams of Parents and never having one, of their own. Therefore, it becomes imperative for every Parent to remember that

“Discipline Is Not a Punishment But It Is The First Act of Love, which stops a child from getting astrayed and wasting this precious gift, Life.”

As Parents, Teachers & Mentors, it is our duty to bring them up giving the right values-The Samskāras, and as the word says “that which has been put together’ and ‘that which puts together’. Absence of values will only lead to disposition of volition, turning life full of regrets and repentance.

Children are soils with the most fruitive tendencies. Don’t force, Inspire them. Not just Teach, Make them Live these values.

-Values are more important in life than fortunes

-Being together is more important than getting ahead of others

-Accepting responsibility is more important than asking for rights

-Obeying is more important than commanding

-Admitting mistakes is more important than accusing others

-Being gentle is more important than acting tough because gentleness is a sign of strength and culture while violence and cruelty are inhuman, animal traits

Give the younger generation these few simple values and it will surely help to carve a better, more responsible human being out of them and ultimately a Better Nation.

Misha Gurjar | Educator | Samsara School

Edited by: Namrata Gupta